Selling Tips

My first piece of advise is to try to maintain a realistic and possibly neutral perspective when putting a value and seeing flaw’s in your car. Many times, a female can point out multiple flaws that a male sometimes cannot see in a car! This is just my experience…

Pricing- Sports Car Market puts out a great price guide which can be purchased here on their website. It covers just about any classic car you can find and it’s pretty accurate.

My general rule in doing business is “UNDERPROMISE and OVERDELIVER“. That way when the buyer show’s up they are very impressed with what they see. You’ve prepared them for the flaw’s the car does have and they are not upset when seeing them in person.

When Payment is being made always verify the funds. If it’s Cash, buy a cash pen. This is available at most office supply stores and it detects counterfeit bills.

Here are some tips which are straight from the buying page:

How long have you owned the car?
Do you have recent pictures?
Is it titled in your name? (If not why and who? This could be a red flag)
How many owners prior to you?
Do you have tools, jack, spare tire, books and manuals? (Bentley Manual)
Do you have receipts for work done?
Has the car undergone restoration?
Are the miles original to the car/engine/trans?
Is the odometer accurate?
Does the car have any accident history?
Does the car have original Paint? (Paint Meters)
Does the car have the original interior?
Is there any rust that you are aware of (Note: Each car has rust prone areas, study yours)
Does the paint have any flaws?
Does the windshield have any flaws?
What type of condition is the chrome and britework?
Does the car’s electrical system all work properly, including radio, headlights, signals, etc? (Don’t for get the power antenna when applicable!)
Does the AC work?
Are there tears in the top? (For cabriolets/targas)
Engine- Any Leaks (Coolant, oil or fuel?), how does it run? Any starting issues when cold or hot?, Does it burn oil? Does it run lean or rich, etc. (Note: Each car has it’s own engine characteristics, study and know what to ask)
Clutch- Slip, Make Noise, chatter?
Transmission- Grinding, jumping out of gear, missing gears, etc.
Shift Linkage/selector- Are all the gears there, Slop in the shifting, popping out of gear, condition of the shift bushings (front and rear in many cars)
Steering- Linkage play, Shakes, shimmies, etc
Suspension- Stock? Lowered? Corner Balanced? Bushings good? Shocks Good? Strut mounts, cross braces, tie rods, etc?
Brakes- Stock or upgraded, lines, rotors, calipers, master cylinder, etc? Are they good? Pedal firm and stopping properly? (Note: The master cylinder on some early porsche’s usually start to leak. When this happens the brake fluid can do damage to the small pan area behind the gas pedal area where the master cylinder is located…)
Tires- Matching, Manufacturers suggested size? How much tread left? Any curbing/bubbles or bad spots?
Wheels- Original? Curb Rash? Bends, Cracks, Scuffs, Knicks, Any damage at all?
BOP- This is commonly known as the “Box of parts” that all great classic cars come with.

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